Yuba Salmon Now

Hammon Bar: A Restoration Success Story
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Hammon Bar: A Restoration Success Story

Seven years ago, SYRCL began the first project in the Lower Yuba River to restore salmon habitat.

In 2011 and 2012 SYRCL planted nearly 6,500 willow and cottonwood cuttings across 5 acres to improve the floodplain habitat that fish use during high flow periods as refuge from swift moving water in the main river channel. 

One goal of this project was to increase riparian vegetation which would provide improved fish habitat through the increase in shading, cover, food availability, and creating geomorphic and hydraulic complexity on the floodplain.

Signs of Spring at Hallwood: Restoration Update
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Signs of Spring at Hallwood: Restoration Update

With more than 1.2 million cubic yards of goldrush-era mining sediment removed, historic floodplain habitat has been exposed for Chinook salmon, steelhead, and sturgeon. Today, miles of seasonal and perennial side channel habitats were carefully engineered to provide additional rearing habitat for native salmonids like Chinook salmon. Details

Fighting for the Yuba’s Threatened Species
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Fighting for the Yuba’s Threatened Species

Our beloved Yuba River once supported massive runs of Chinook salmon and steelhead that served as a keystone species that supported ecosystems from the Sierra to the sea. Legend says that the fish runs were so dense in the Yuba River that one could run across the water on the backs of salmon! Details

Yuba Salmon Now Update: Federal Judge Says it’s Time to End Debate on Yuba River Dams
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Yuba Salmon Now Update: Federal Judge Says it’s Time to End Debate on Yuba River Dams

SYRCL and Friends of the River recently sent a letter to the National Marine Fisheries Service to compel the agency to craft a watershed-wide solution to save the threatened species native to the Yuba Watershed, including Spring-run Chinook salmon, steelhead trout, and green sturgeon. The letter demands a new biological opinion, presenting compelling evidence that harm caused by the Corps’ dams, compounded by increased harm from climate change, is responsible for the dramatic decrease in Yuba River fish populations. Details